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NACE SP21459-2020/IEEE Std 2655-2018, “Atmospheric Above Grade Inspection and Assessment of Corrosion on Steel Electrical Transmission, Distribution, and Substation Structures”

There are an estimated 900,000 electric utility steel transmission and distribution structures in North America alone. The majority of these structures were installed between 1950 and 1990.  These structures are now an average of about 45 years of age.  The age of these structures dictates an inspection and assessment procedure to determine the level of corrosion affecting the above-grade atmospherically exposed portions of this important segment of our infrastructure.

 

Prior to the publication of this standard, no industry practice existed to help electric utilities determine a prioritized listing of structures to be inspected or that described an inspection and assessment procedure to evaluate above-grade atmospheric corrosion problems.

 

Product Number: SP21459-2020
ISBN: 1-57590-408-X
Publication Date: 2020
$89.00
$89.00
$89.00

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There are an estimated 900,000 electric utility steel transmission and distribution structures in North America alone. The majority of these structures were installed between 1950 and 1990.  These structures are now an average of about 45 years of age.  The age of these structures dictates an inspection and assessment procedure to determine the level of corrosion affecting the above-grade atmospherically exposed portions of this important segment of our infrastructure.

 

Prior to the publication of this standard, no industry practice existed to help electric utilities determine a prioritized listing of structures to be inspected or that described an inspection and assessment procedure to evaluate above-grade atmospheric corrosion problems.

 

This standard is intended for use by electric utility personnel, contractors, inspectors, and those interested in the impact of corrosion on the above-grade sections of transmission, distribution, and substation steel structures.  It provides requirements to: (1) help utilities identify structures that may be at a high risk for above-grade corrosion; (2) inspect the selected structures; (3) categorize the condition of structures based on corrosion degradation; (4) prioritize structures requiring additional inspection based on those findings; and (5) help identify next steps as required.

 

This standard is limited to the inspection and assessment of steel transmission towers, poles, distribution poles, and substation structures, including galvanized and painted mild steel structures, as well as other similar structures.

 

Key words:  Transmission and distribution structure, above-grade corrosion, atmospherically exposed, steel transmission tower, distribution pole, substation structure, field inspection, TG 529.

There are an estimated 900,000 electric utility steel transmission and distribution structures in North America alone. The majority of these structures were installed between 1950 and 1990.  These structures are now an average of about 45 years of age.  The age of these structures dictates an inspection and assessment procedure to determine the level of corrosion affecting the above-grade atmospherically exposed portions of this important segment of our infrastructure.

 

Prior to the publication of this standard, no industry practice existed to help electric utilities determine a prioritized listing of structures to be inspected or that described an inspection and assessment procedure to evaluate above-grade atmospheric corrosion problems.

 

This standard is intended for use by electric utility personnel, contractors, inspectors, and those interested in the impact of corrosion on the above-grade sections of transmission, distribution, and substation steel structures.  It provides requirements to: (1) help utilities identify structures that may be at a high risk for above-grade corrosion; (2) inspect the selected structures; (3) categorize the condition of structures based on corrosion degradation; (4) prioritize structures requiring additional inspection based on those findings; and (5) help identify next steps as required.

 

This standard is limited to the inspection and assessment of steel transmission towers, poles, distribution poles, and substation structures, including galvanized and painted mild steel structures, as well as other similar structures.

 

Key words:  Transmission and distribution structure, above-grade corrosion, atmospherically exposed, steel transmission tower, distribution pole, substation structure, field inspection, TG 529.

Also Purchased

Ethics for the Corrosion Professional (English Version)

Product Number: Ethics eCourse
$99.00

The corrosion profession, and the certified professionals who work in the industry, are committed to protecting people, assets and the environment from the effects of corrosion. Those tasked with delivering the technical expertise to society must conduct their work with the knowledge and understanding of the ethical principles expected and required of those professionals.

The NACE International Code of Ethics is discussed in conjunction with case studies and features real-life ethical violations of the NACE International Institute attestations. Frameworks for making ethical decisions are reviewed in this course along with the factors in the corrosion industry that can lead to unethical behavior.

The course is an online, self-paced course which should take no longer than 1.5 to 2 hours to complete.

Purchase of this course includes a one-year subscription and is non-refundable. Students will have access to all course materials for a period of one year from the date of registration. All course work must be completed during this time period. Extensions or transfers cannot be granted.

 

Section 1 | Introduction

  • Recognize the importance of upholding ethical standards across the Corrosion Prevention and Control industry.

Section 2 | Professional Ethics

  • Differentiate between ethics, morals and values.
  • Discuss how the Six Pillars of Character embody the ethical values of a professional.
  • Explain why ethics is important within professional settings.

Section 3 | Factors that Lead to Unethical Decision Making

  • Describe what an unethical decision is.
  • Describe how rationalizations are used to justify unethical decisions in a professional setting.
  • Recognize the factors that can lead an individual to make an unethical decision.

Section 4 | Types of Unethical Behavior

  • Identify types of unethical behavior seen when working in the corrosion industry.
  • Describe the consequences of engaging in unethical behavior.

Section 5 | A Framework for Ethical Decision Making

  • Explain what ethical dilemmas are and why they occur within professional environments.
  • Apply an ethical decision-making framework to solve ethical dilemmas.