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UP Periscope: Hunting for the Scope of Work

Building upon the balanced equifinality principle, the authors explore the placement and wording of the scope of work in painting specifications and specifications in general. Often the scope is buried in a thick labyrinth of complex legal requirements, general conditions, special terms, forms, attestations, and overly inclusive technical specifications which are in reality engineering standards. 

Product Number: 51217-044-SG
Author: Troy Fraebel, Chuck Fite
Publication Date: 2017
Industry: Coatings
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Building upon the balanced equifinality principle, the authors explore the placement and wording of the scope of work in painting specifications and specifications in general. Often the scope is buried in a thick labyrinth of complex legal requirements, general conditions, special terms, forms, attestations, and overly inclusive technical specifications which are in reality engineering standards. Invitations to bid can be similarly cumbersome. Contractors, material suppliers, equipment suppliers, inspectors and others can find it difficult to decide whether to bid, let alone what to bid. Sometimes it seems that one needs a periscope to see what is going on. The authors provide examples of good and not so good scope of work statements. Guidance is also provided on how to make documentation friendlier to readers - especially at the bidding stage - for those writing invitations to bid, contract documents, and specifications.

Building upon the balanced equifinality principle, the authors explore the placement and wording of the scope of work in painting specifications and specifications in general. Often the scope is buried in a thick labyrinth of complex legal requirements, general conditions, special terms, forms, attestations, and overly inclusive technical specifications which are in reality engineering standards. Invitations to bid can be similarly cumbersome. Contractors, material suppliers, equipment suppliers, inspectors and others can find it difficult to decide whether to bid, let alone what to bid. Sometimes it seems that one needs a periscope to see what is going on. The authors provide examples of good and not so good scope of work statements. Guidance is also provided on how to make documentation friendlier to readers - especially at the bidding stage - for those writing invitations to bid, contract documents, and specifications.

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