Search
Filters
Close

Black Friday Deal - 25% off eCourses. Use Code ECOURSE25 at checkout! Shop Now!

NACE SP0176-2022, Corrosion Control of Submerged Areas of Permanently Installed Steel Offshore Structures Associated with Petroleum Production

Offshore structures represent large capital investments. Structures are being placed in offshore areas worldwide and are being designed to withstand forces resulting from hurricanes, arctic storms, tidal currents, earthquakes, and ice floes. Moreover, platform structures are currently being placed in deeper waters and, therefore, have become larger, more complex, and more expensive. Control of corrosion on structures is necessary for the economic development of oil and gas production, to provide safe support for working and living areas, and to avoid potential harm to the environment. Corrosion on offshore structures can be divided into three major areas:  the submerged zone, the splash zone, and the atmospheric zone. The submerged zone also includes that portion of the structure below the mudline. For the purposes of this standard, offshore structures are stationary structures (platforms or subsea facilities) that are fixed to the sea floor by gravity, pilings, or mooring cables.

Product Number: NACE SP0176-2022
Publication Date: 2022
$89.00
$89.00
$89.00

Or

Offshore structures represent large capital investments. Structures are being placed in offshore areas worldwide and are being designed to withstand forces resulting from hurricanes, arctic storms, tidal currents, earthquakes, and ice floes. Moreover, platform structures are currently being placed in deeper waters and, therefore, have become larger, more complex, and more expensive. Control of corrosion on structures is necessary for the economic development of oil and gas production, to provide safe support for working and living areas, and to avoid potential harm to the environment. Corrosion on offshore structures can be divided into three major areas:  the submerged zone, the splash zone, and the atmospheric zone. The submerged zone also includes that portion of the structure below the mudline. For the purposes of this standard, offshore structures are stationary structures (platforms or subsea facilities) that are fixed to the sea floor by gravity, pilings, or mooring cables.

Keywords: corrosion control, offshore structures, steel

Offshore structures represent large capital investments. Structures are being placed in offshore areas worldwide and are being designed to withstand forces resulting from hurricanes, arctic storms, tidal currents, earthquakes, and ice floes. Moreover, platform structures are currently being placed in deeper waters and, therefore, have become larger, more complex, and more expensive. Control of corrosion on structures is necessary for the economic development of oil and gas production, to provide safe support for working and living areas, and to avoid potential harm to the environment. Corrosion on offshore structures can be divided into three major areas:  the submerged zone, the splash zone, and the atmospheric zone. The submerged zone also includes that portion of the structure below the mudline. For the purposes of this standard, offshore structures are stationary structures (platforms or subsea facilities) that are fixed to the sea floor by gravity, pilings, or mooring cables.

Keywords: corrosion control, offshore structures, steel